Behind the Veil

I work in the real estate development business, but my perspective has always been from the accounting and finance group.  I was a ski bum in Vail after college.  I waited tables at a fancy hotel like so many other ski bums, and it wasn’t my plan to stay in the mountains.  But, the lifestyle was great, I felt healthy and stimulated, and I saw there were real opportunities to work hard and have a career.

A relatively easy entry into accounting in many resort towns is as revenue auditor.  Plus, it usually means you work at night and can ski all day.

photo credit to http://www.vacationdifferently.com

The following is a list of accounting jobs from the lowest level to the highest.  I’ve done all of them.

The Revenue Auditor makes sure the front-line staff recorded all their sales transactions correctly.  The auditor makes sure the point-of-sale system tells the same story as the actual cash and electronic payments received.  Once the revenue auditor signs off and corrects any errors, the daily sales can get recorded in the books.

photo credit to http://www.businessnewsdaily.com

The Accounts Payable Clerk is the person you want to know if you rely on a company to pay you.  The A/P clerk enters all the invoices into the accounting system for payment and cuts the checks and disburses them when it’s time to pay.  An organized A/P clerk is essential to a reliable accounting department, for both ensuring expenses are recorded accurately and in a timely manner and for managing cash flow.  In a big company the flow of invoices through the A/P clerk can be overwhelming but good A/P clerks develop procedures and schedules to keep everyone happy.  This is the person most likely to have the famous (in accounting departments at least) sign above their desk that reads “Lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part”.

The GL/Staff Accountant doesn’t enter invoices for payment but makes all the journal entries for a company.  Cash deposits and transfers, interest payable and receivable, depreciation and amortization, month-end adjustments and write-offs and maybe even payroll get entered into the system by the staff accountant.  They have the power to keep the books clean and accurate or to really screw them up.

The Financial Analyst is not really an accountant but works closely with the department to harvest financial data and create accurate, relevant, and useful reports for management to use in decision-making.  They often have access to the accounting software so they can write reports directly in the system for easy output. 

photo credit to http://www.odotobribank.com

The Assistant Controller is the catch-all once you’ve moved beyond A/P Clerk and G/L Accountant.  Every CFO has been an assistant controller somewhere along the way, and if a company has only one or two accountants, someone is the assistant controller.  The role is responsible for making sure the activity recorded on the books is accurate, that you’re not bouncing checks, that your source documents are organized and auditable, and everyone higher up is getting what they need. 

The Controller usually isn’t in the software except for review.   The controller is managing cash flows in and out, signing checks, and closely following sales.  The controller is reviewing and finalizing financial reports, preparing cash forecasts, dealing with auditors, and overseeing tax work.  The controller may often have some responsibility over the human resources/payroll department and the technology services group.

The VP of Finance is the person in charge of business plans and budgets and matching up the actual work of the accounting department versus budgets while looking into the future.   The VP of Finance needs reliable information from the Controller but also works closely with heads of sales, project management, capital improvements, and other departments to make sure overall company performance is on the right track.  You’ll often find an Ivy League MBA in this role.

photo credit to http://www.medium.com

The Chief Financial Officer is the boss.  He or she talks to lenders, investors, Wall Street, the CEO and anyone else who is important to the finances of the business.  The CFO is where the buck stops on the finance side of the business.  You’ll usually find someone here with great technical skills and excellent personal and communication skills.  It takes both to get to the top.

photo credit to http://www.roberthalf.com

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Author: edmorgan1

I am an accounting and finance professional focused in the real estate development sector in the North Lake Tahoe and Reno area. I have managed the accounting and financing of large master-planned communities in high end resort areas with complex arrangements for large public companies and for private asset managers. I am experienced in GAAP financial reporting, business plans, cash forecasting, variance reporting, audits, treasury management and tax. I have helped companies grow and downsize during the real estate cycle and have a proven ability to manage diverse teams through real estate matters. In my current role I am managing a 900 unit master planned community through a change in ownership and am seeking new residential development opportunities in Northern Nevada.